Jennifer Cockrall-King | Jennifer Cockrall-King
1
archive,author,author-zling,author-1,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-title-hidden,qode-theme-ver-10.0,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-4.12,vc_responsive

Food and the City is published in Korean translation by Samcheolli publishing, 2015   Getting "Power Blogged" in Seoul Otherwise known as Driving Around in Seoul with Koreans. This was one of the more insane and entertaining parts of my book launch week with my translation, Mr. Chang-Woo Lee (front seat), and Korean powerblogger, whose handle is Gagutalktalk. Click here for video. ...

FOOD AND THE CITY: URBAN AGRICULTURE AND THE NEW FOOD REVOLUTION (PROMETHEUS BOOKS: AMHERST, NY) “With this incisive study of the urban farming movement, Canadian food writer Cockrall-King identifies weak links in complex global food chains supplying supersized retailers...

The publisher calls Food Artisans of the Okanagan: Your guide to locally crafted fare, "The ultimate food lover's guide to finding the best of the best in the vibrant Okanagan." This is a 320-page, full colour book about the best culinary craftspeople in the vibrant Okanagan and Similkameen food scene. This includes farm-to-table chefs, bakers, beekeepers, orchardists, farmers, market gardeners, butchers and charcutiers, fisherpeople, coffee roasters, distillers, craft brewers, chocolatiers, millers, foragers, cheesemakers, fishmongers, and producers of fine craft food products. The detailed maps will help you find your way to the flavours that are making the Okanagan and Similkameen valleys the top rated culinary destination not only in Canada, but in the world. $19.95 US / $24.95 CAN Available in bookstores, wineshops, and online as of April 5th. TouchWood Editions. Enjoy the journey. ...

Food and the City is published in French translation (with updates in 2016) by Éditions Écosociété. Distributed in Canada, France, Switzerland and Belguim Préface de Marie Eisenmann et Vincent Galarneau | Traduit de l'anglais par Geneviève Boulanger Synopsis: En quête de solutions de rechange au système agro-industriel, si néfaste pour la santé et pour l'environnement, des hommes et des femmes du monde entier se mobilisent depuis une quinzaine d'années pour ramener la production et la distribution des aliments au cœur de nos villes. Alliant savoir-faire agricoles ancestraux et innovations écologiques, ils sont de plus en plus nombreux à se lancer dans la production biologique de proximité. Un peu chaotique, totalement libre et spontanément décentralisée, c'est la révolution de l'agriculture urbaine! Dans ce récit captivant, qui se lit comme un carnet de voyage, Jennifer Cockrall-King part à la rencontre des protagonistes du mouvement et témoigne du foisonnement des initiatives en cours dans une dizaine de villes d'Europe et d'Amérique du Nord ainsi qu'à Cuba. Plants de tomates et fines herbes sur les balcons, poulaillers dans les cours arrière, ruches sur les toits, vignobles urbains, jardins communautaires, maraîchage intensif dans des serres commerciales, forêts nourricières, aquaponie, fermes verticales: ces pratiques, respectueuses de la Terre, laissent...

Westerlies Cottage Life West, Spring 2017 Many years ago, my parents and their longtime cottaging friends came up with a way to get competitive about the arrival of spring. Each side—they literally live across the water from one another—casts a few bets on the date that the lake ice will “go out.” We’re not talking break up in the bays. There has to be open water in the middle of Lac Ste. Anne. (It’s usually a couple of weeks after the geese return and just seem to stand around on the every-darkening ice. Maybe they have their own bets going too.) The side that comes closest to the actual date wins “a really good bottle of wine.” The neighbourly custom is to share the winning bottle(s). In other words, everyone wins. So begins the rituals of spring at our family’s cottage. Friendly betting pools. Monitoring the ice breakup. Planning the garden. Washing down outdoor furniture. Cleaning and organizing the garage. Repairing pier sections. And devising new ways to keep the geese and ducks from turning those pier sections into a slippery mess. Every year, of course, unexpected projects pop up. For instance, the lack of snow in Central Alberta this past winter meant the cold...

The Best Tips for Stocking Your Woodpile   Norwegian tree feller Lars Mytting gives us the lowdown on wood. By Jennifer Cockrall-King | enRoute magazine Dec 2016 You don’t need heavy liquor all the time. Sometimes beer is fine,” author Lars Mytting jokes as we enter his woodshed in the little town of Elverum, surrounded by birch-studded forest in the interior of Norway. Showing me the variety in his wood collection, he makes an analogy to a well-stocked bar or a wine cellar. He likes to pair different woods that have different combustion characteristics: Some give off fast heat and bright light, others burn slowly and create hot, glowing embers, so he doesn’t have to keep stoking the two wood stoves in his house. A novelist, Mytting became an international celebrity when he wrote a slender meditation called Hel Ved (Solid Wood) on a very Norwegian obsession. Now in translation in 16 languages, Norwegian Wood: Chopping, Stacking, and Drying Wood the Scandinavian Way has sold more than 500,000 copies since its release. He tells me he was baffled by the book’s success, but these days he’s not surprised that a parka-clad pilgrim would drive one and a half hours from Oslo for a chat. The man,...

Three-ring Meal By JENNIFER COCKRALL-KING I sat frozen, wanting to reach for my wine. My extremities had long ago been numbed by the cold but the syrah was icing over. With two layers of thermal underwear, a parka, and wearing my puffiest down-filled winter mittens, every manoeuver required precision. I reached out, formed my hand into a claw, advanced it to-ward the glass. It was like dining using the Canadarm. I slowly brought it back towards me towards my lips, tipped it up, and took a generous glug. Mission accomplished. There we were, a collection of extreme diners, doing our best to manipulate knives and forks in sub- zero weather. It was January and we were in a farmer’s field, hours away from any city, near the aptly named town of Viking, Alberta. (Those who weren’t dressed in Everest-mountaineer outfits were swaddled in animal pelts.) Here, Blair Lebsack of Edmonton’s RGE RD restaurant had built a walled enclosure with giant hay bales and was serving a six-course meal of hay-smoked pork hocks, beet “caviar” and local whisky hot toddies. We dined away under a Ted Harrison sky while coyotes yipped in the distance. Dining outdoors in January on the Canadian prairies might be carrying...

The world’s finest avant-garde chefs descend on Alberta And find an underrated food wonderland   Jennifer Cockrall-King Cook It Raw Alberta chefs share an afternoon picnic lunch of roast duck and charcuterie with founder and director, Alessandro Porcelli at Upper Kananaskis Lake. Chefs L to R: Magnus Ek (Oaxen Krog & Slip, Stockholm), Cam Dobranski (Brasserie Kensington, Calgary), Duncan Ly (Calgary), (kneeling) Darren MacLean (Shokunin, Calgary. SAIT culinary instructor Scott Pohorelic and me in the middle background. Photo by Mark Mahaney (for Maclean's magazine). Published on Maclean's online October 30, 2015; in November 7, 2015 print issue. On a cloudless October afternoon, Albert Adrià—chef sibling of Ferran Adrià, and his partner in the game-changing elBulli (closed now, but, for over a decade the world’s most famously inventive restaurant)—was in Calgary creating ethereal perfection on a waffle iron that looked straight out of a Holiday Inn Express. One by one, he handed off waffles to Calgary chefs John Michael MacNeil and Scott Pohorelic, who smeared them with thick, snow-white yogourt, purple saskatoon-berry purée and crumbled almond spongecake. They scooped smoked ice milk drizzled with birch syrup into cups as giddy guests waited. #TeamSaskatoon, as they became known on Twitter, weren’t just making waffles; they were making the...